Stuff you may have missed for January 31, 2012

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Snapped: Chiropractors’ Association of Australia advertised homeopathic cream; TGA sets the record straight

Late in 2011 the Chiropractors’ Association of Australia was caught out advertising a homeopathic “pain relief” cream from “Simply Flower Power” in a catalog after a complaint about was made to the Australian Therapeutic Goods Administration.

When questioned by the TGA about the advertisement, the CAA initially argued that the law didn’t apply to them before asserting that the representation “Natural Pain Relief Cream that really works!” was “a statement of ‘mere puffery’ that has no balance or substance”.

The cream is manufactured by Simply Flower Power; operated by Jessica Read, a Chiropractor who identifies herself as a “holistic healer” who performs “Aura and Chakra Balancing” and “Crystal, Colour & Sound Healing”.

The TGA’s Complaint Resolution Panel, who systematically investigates complaints of misleading health claims, noted in their formal findings that they found the CAA’s argument to be “quite extraordinary” particularly because it was made by an organisation purportedly to be representing “healthcare professionals”.

While the CAA were keen to market the cream as something that “really works!”, the panel noted that the CAA was “in no way prepared to argue that the words were truthful or accurate”, and were explicitly concerned at the unwillingness of the Chiropractors’ Association of Australia to acknowledge responsibility for the material they had published.

Since the publication of the advertisement, the CAA has ceased selling the product; the TGA has requested the CAA contact the parties who were provided with the misleading claims, provide evidence that they have withdrawn the misleading representations, and provide evidence that they have complied with the other sanctions imposed by the TGA.

Stuff you may have missed for January 26, 2012

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Surf Coast Skepticamp 2012

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The 40th Worldwide SkeptiCamp (Australia’s 3rd) was held along the Great Ocean Road. An awesome overview of the event, with some interesting insights are available over at Skeptic School.

The JREF also have an article on the event, too.

SkeptiCamp is based on the BarCamp conference model, where there are no set talks, and everyone is free to hold their own talk.

Well done to all involved!

Special thanks to @JoBenhamu and @lobisomen77 for the photos.

Regenerative Medicine: What is it, and how could it affect us?

“There are emerging radical technologies that have the potential to change the way we live. This animation on regenerative medicine is part of a series for a session at the Adelaide Festival of Ideas exploring the contribution of enabling bio- and nano- technologies and their associated socio-cultural, health, safety and environmental impacts. We ask what excites you about this? What frightens you? And explore how they may change the way we live.”

See more at http://adelaidefestivalofideas.com.au/three-technologies-that-will-change-the-way-we-live/

httpv://www.youtube.com/watch?v=QI-SZpoSCAM

Would you eat “Synthetic Meat”?

“There are emerging radical technologies that have the potential to change the way we live. This animation on synthetic meat is part of a series for a session at the Adelaide Festival of Ideas exploring the contribution of enabling bio- and nano- technologies and their associated socio-cultural, health, safety and environmental impacts. We ask what excites you about this? What frightens you? And explore how they may change the way we live.”

httpv://www.youtube.com/watch?v=iO9q_paCcWA

See more at:
http://adelaidefestivalofideas.com.au/three-technologies-that-will-change-the-way-we-live/

Science in progress: The refinement of knowledge

The following clip from NASA’s Goddard Institute looks at the two Voyager spacecraft and the results from data still being sent back about the edge of the heliosphere, over three decades after their launch.

The clip also demonstrates how after new information is discovered, scientists adapt the theory to explain the new evidence, rather than ignoring te new evidence, or manipulating it to fit the theory.

httpv://www.youtube.com/watch?v=qq3U5o4Yblw

Stuff you may have missed for January 12, 2012

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